Skip to main content

Excellent results for Greater Manchester heart failure remote monitoring project

NEWS

Excellent results for Greater Manchester heart failure remote monitoring project

Greater Manchester and Eastern Cheshire Cardiac Clinical Network, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, FCMS and Docobo have collaborated in a year-long successful project to remotely monitor patients who are waiting for cardiovascular surgery.

More than 250 patients have been supported by using a device to daily input information, such as their blood pressure, and record any symptoms, so they can carry on their lives as normal.

The people were awaiting specialist cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafts or valve replacement at three hospitals in Greater Manchester.

Technology provider Docobo provided patients in the Greater Manchester area with required equipment, including a device that allowed them to input daily information such as their blood pressure. Patients were asked to record their symptoms and submit data on a daily basis, with a direct link to a team of clinicians at FCMS to help spot any potential deterioration.

Any worrying symptoms or data inputted into the device would result in a telephone call from a nurse. Amber alerts would identify patients whose self-reported health data or physiological parameters were slightly outside of normal parameters. This enabled the team to offer earlier intervention when needed and patients could be prioritised and offered support as appropriate.

The approach has not only reduced the waiting time for high-risk elective patients but also minimised overall hospital stays, while the feedback from patients has been very positive. They said they were happier to be monitored in their own homes, rather than having to take regular trips to the clinic or hospital.

 Catherine Cain, senior programme lead for the Cardiovascular Network said: “Remote monitoring has proven to be a significant advantage for our elective cardiac surgery patients and this project is rightly putting the patient at the heart of care.

“By ensuring monitoring at home, clinical teams can discharge in-patients awaiting surgery. Similarly, after surgery, patients can now be discharged earlier with remote monitoring, resulting in shorter hospital stays and the release of beds.”

Tom Berry, directorate manager for cardiac surgery and transplant, said: “As is the case across the NHS, our waiting list has grown and this project will help us to identify patients who require earlier support or treatment.”

The approach supports recent NHSE guidance which recommends monitoring patients on the elective cardiac surgery pathway and post-surgery more effectively.

“Remote monitoring has proven to be a significant advantage for our elective cardiac surgery patients and this project is rightly putting the patient at the heart of care. By ensuring monitoring at home, clinical teams can discharge in-patients awaiting surgery. Similarly, after surgery, patients can now be discharged earlier with remote monitoring, resulting in shorter hospital stays and the release of beds.”

Catherine CainSenior programme lead for the Cardiovascular Network
Print Friendly, PDF & Email